Esther Velez

write more. write better

Category: Writing (page 2 of 2)

LOST in the Mystery Box

myster-box-lost-01My family has been re-watching LOST, and it’s got me thinking about something called the “Mystery Box”.

In 2007, JJ Abrams gave a TED Talk about the role of mystery in stories.

He called it the Mystery Box, and it represents the questions that are raised to keep us interested in the story.

In summary, it’s showing something mysterious and revealing the truth over time – or never.

You can watch the talk here to better understand it. (Note: has a little bit of cursing on par with LOST)

Even a casual viewing of LOST provides evidence of the mystery box. There’s so much about LOST that’s withheld from you until the last possible moment.

Do you remember the whole mystery surrounding Henry Gale and what it meant to be an Other?  Talk about mystery box. Or what about the whole mystery of the Island in general?

But are mysteries – the answered and unanswered ones – good or bad?

We’ll explore that question by looking at stories such as LOST, Star Wars, A Series of Unfortunate Events, Falling Up’s discography, and Inception.

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Write More, Write Better

Fact: The more you write, the better you become.

It doesn’t matter what kind of writing you do.

The more time you spend stringing words together, you’ll start noticing things you never noticed before.

Every time I put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard), I’m gaining experience that’s shaping me into the writer I’m becoming.

Maybe I’m learning consistency or disciple. Maybe I’m learning how to be concise.

Either way, the more time I spend on it, the more I improve.

That is the heart of “Write More, Write Better”. It’s being consistent, showing up, and giving your writing a chance to flourish.

You may not be the greatest writer in the world, but the more you write, the better writer you’ll become.

Church Skits: Analyzed

[fusion_text]If you’ve been around church long enough, you’ve seen (and possibly been part of) a church skit.

You know the kind. The group gets a verse or topic, and they make a skit about it.

And if that group is comprised of teenagers, it’s almost guaranteed that they’ll get very cliche with the characters’ struggles (aka: drinking, cutting, or getting pregnant – all real struggles, all used in nearly every church skit you see about people backsliding).

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Your Worst Story Is Probably Your Best

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I was recently going through my old files, and the first thing I noticed was the sheer amount of stories that I have created.

They were poorly written, didn’t make any sense, and probably didn’t get past a few pages.

Every time I came across them, I was just reminded of the fact that I’m an incompletionist: I start things, but I never complete them.

Something was different about this time, though.

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Top 3 Writing Moments of 2015

#3 – When I made a fire metaphor that everyone thought was literal.

I started writing “Ms. Kerri” back in 2014, but it never really took shape until March 2015. I had graduated from college a few months before, and I was still feeling very much like an English Major.

When it came to write the opening scene for the story, I decided to go with a metaphor, likening a sibling argument to the start of a devastating fire. However, the language was kinda vague (okay, in retrospect, it was totally vague) and 100% of the readers were confused.

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